Title Author Publisher ISBN Date
Taking Education Really Seriously Michael Fielding RoutledgeFalmer 0415252105 2001
Real Education: varieties of freedom David Gribble Libertarian Education 0951399756 1998
Understanding Waldorf Education : Teaching from the Inside Out Jack Petrash Gryphon House 0876592469 2002
The Foundations of Human Experience Rudolf Steiner Steiner Books 0880103922 1996
The Montessori Method Maria Montessori Kuperard 0805209220 1989
Alternative Approaches to Education Fiona Carnie Routledge (UK) 0415248175 2002
The Pestalozzi Experiment in Child-based Education Rebecca Wild Shambhala Publications 1570624550 2006
To Educate the Human Potential Maria Montessori Clio Press 1851090940 1989
The Secret of Childhood Maria Montessori Ballantine Books 0345305833 1966
The Discovery of the Child Maria Montessori Clio Press 185109086X 1997
The Handbook of Education and Human Development David R. Olson and Nancy Torrance Blackwell Publishers 0631211861 1998
The Philosophy of Human Learning Christopher Winch Routledge 0415161908 1998
Complexities of Teaching : Child-Centred Perspectives Ciaran Surgrue Falmer Press 0750704799 1997
The Aims of Education and Other Essays Alfred North Whitehead Simon & Schuster 0029351804 1967
How Children Learn John Holt Perseus Publishing 0201484048 1995
Learning all the time John Holt Addison Wesley Publishing Company 0201550911 1990
Summerhill: A Radical Approach to Child Rearing A. S. Neill Hart Pub Co 0805512993 1984
Summerhill School : A New View of Childhood A. S. Neill St. Martin’s Griffin 0312141378 1995
Freedom: Not License! A. S. Neill Hart Pub Co 0805500162 1966
Experience And Education John Dewey Free Press 0684838281 1997
Democracy And Education John Dewey Free Press 0684836319 1997
Education and the Significance of Life Jiddu Krishnamurti HarperSanFrancisco 0060648767 1981
Minding the Light: Essays in Friendly Pedagogy Dalke, A., Dixson, B. and Dalke, A. (Eds) Peter Lang Pub Inc 0820463574 2006
The Challenge to Care in Schools Nel Noddings Columbia University Teachers College Press 0807746096 1992

 

Learning Mentors work with the student on one-to-one level. We tend to call this vertical mentoring which is different from horizontal mentoring, such as group mentoring and peer mentoring. There are broadly five key aspects to the work of mentoring between an adult learning mentor and a student:

Getting to know the student
– getting to know the student’s background (eg, life history)
– understanding the student’s character traits (eg. learning biography)
– knowing the student’s strengths and weaknesses (eg. talents, skills and knowledge)
– discovering the student’s personal goals (eg. main interests and passions)

Setting the context for learning
– the context of secondary education and educational processes of schooling to link education to one’s overall personal development
– the context of the curriculum and each aspect of it to clarify what to study and why
– the context of standards to understand what counts as progress and how to make progress accordingly

Helping construct personal goals, Learning Agreement and tailored curriculum
– articulating a set of goals for the short, medium and long term
– drawing up a Learning Agreement
– formulating a learning plan
– mapping out the student’s learning activities

Nurturing, challenging and supporting the student’s holistic development
– being attentive the student’s learning processes
– posing right questions at the right time to encourage the student’s reflection on learning and experiences
– helping the student pinpoint the obstacles to learning and overcome them
– enabling the student forge a picture of their future and learning trajectories towards it

Providing feedback
– providing feedback on the student learning
– reviewing student’s progress
– preparing a personalised record to represent progress (eg. learning portfolios)

Whilst one-to-one mentoring with a dedicated Learning Mentor is one approach to implementing mentoring, schools might also consider other models, such as group mentoring (facilitated by an adult) and peer mentoring, in which students are empowered to support and guide one another. These other approaches to mentoring will have many common features, and all mentors (peer or adult) will require training in active listening, dialogue and mutual learning.